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META TOPICPARENT name="WindowsHASPInstallation"

Net Hasp Installation Archive Document

Note: This document is considered OBSOLETE, as it does not apply to current versions of APPX. However, customers running older versions may find the information it contains to be useful.


Installing NetHASP On Your Network

Version 5

This file describes the steps required to install the NetHASP key on a station, and to adapt the other stations in the network to the NetHASP system.

You must set the APPX_NET_HASP environment variable to '1' on each workstation in order to instruct Appx to look for the NetHASP.

Installing NetHASP on a Station in the Network

Connect the NetHASP key to one of the computers in the network. This computer, called the NetHASP Server, does not necessarily have to be the network file server. You can connect the NetHASP key to any computer on the network, providing you activate the appropriate NetHASP Server Program.

The NetHASP Server Program is independent of the NetHASP key and of the protected application. It functions as an intermediate between the two. Regardless of the environment in which the protected application is activated, DOS, Windows, Windows NT, or OS/2, you can activate any one of the NetHASP Server Programs to communicate
with the protected application and the key.

When several applications are protected with different NetHASP keys, you can daisy-chain all of the keys to a single NetHASP Server. One NetHASP Server Program can communicate with several NetHASP keys connected to the NetHASP Server, and with up to 250 protected applications running in the entire network.

When you turn on the NetHASP Server, you must load the NetHASP Server Program. Both the NetHASP Server and the NetHASP Server Program must operate as long as one of the stations is running a protected application.

The following sections describe the installation procedure of the NetHASP Server on various stations and servers in the network.

Installing NetHASP on a DOS/Windows Station

If the NetHASP Server is one of the network stations, or a Novell
non-dedicated server, load HASPSERV.EXE in a DOS environment. In a
Windows environment load NHSRVWIN.EXE after you activate the
network drivers. To load the NetHASP Server Program automatically,
perform the following:

To load HASPSERV.EXE automatically, add the following line to the
AUTOEXEC.BAT file of the NetHASP Server:

haspserv

To remove HASPSERV.EXE delete the call line from the AUTOEXEC.BAT
file and reboot the station (recommended). Alternatively, enter the
following command at the DOS prompt:

haspserv /r

To load NHSRVWIN.EXE automatically, add its icon to the "StartUp"
group. To remove NHSRVWIN.EXE click on the "Remove" item in the
!NetHASP Server Program menu bar.

Installing NetHASP on a Netware 286 Dedicated Server

1. Copy HASPSERV.VAP to the SYS:SYSTEM sub-directory.

2. Reboot the file server.

3. A message appears asking whether HASPSERV should be installed.
Answer, YES.

If you do not want this message to appear each time you load the
server, create a file named SERVER.CFG (if you do not already have
one), in the SYS:SYSTEM sub-directory. The file should contain the
following line:

vap wait = 10

Installing NetHASP on a Netware 386 Dedicated Server

1. Copy HASPSERV.NLM to the SYS:SYSTEM directory.

2. To load the NetHASP Server Program, enter:

load haspserv.nlm

Alternatively, you can add this line to the AUTOEXEC.NCF file
in the SYS:SYSTEM directory.

3. To remove HASPSERV.NLM enter the following command:

unload haspserv

Installing NetHASP on an OS/2 Server

To install the NetHASP Server Program on an OS/2 file server (Lan
Manager, Lan Server, 3Com, etc.) perform the following:

1. Copy NHSRVOS2.EXE to the file server.

2. To activate the NetHASP Server, at the OS/2 command prompt
enter:

nhsrvos2

Alternatively you can enter:

start nhsrvos2

To load the NetHASP Server automatically at boot time, add one
of these lines to the STARTUP.CMD file.

3. To switch to other active sessions, press <ctrl>-<esc> to
receive a list of tasks for selection.

4. To terminate the NetHASP Server operation, switch to the
NetHASP Server session, and press "Q".


To create an icon for NHSRVOS2.EXE perform the following:

1. From the Desk Top, double click on the Templates icon.

2. In the Templates window drag the Program icon out to the Desk
Top.

3. As you release the dragged Program icon, a book named Program
Settings opens.

4. Enter values in the following fields:
Path and file name: enter the full path and filename of the
NHSRVOS2.EXE program file.
Optional Parameters: enter command line switches, if any are
required.

5. To assign a title to the icon, click on the General item
located in the right margin of the book.

6. Enter the new title in the Title field, and select an icon of
your own choice.

7. Close the book by clicking the box in its top left-hand
corner.

Note! Do not place the NHSRVOS2 icon in the Startup group.

Installing NetHASP on a Windows NT Station

To install NetHASP on Windows NT:

1. Connect the NetHASP key to a Windows NT machine; this machine now
becomes the NetHASP Server.

2. To optimize response from the NetHASP Server Program, set the Tasking
Option on the NetHASP Server (see "Setting the Tasking Option on the
NetHASP Server" below).

3. Use hinstall.exe to install the HASP Device Driver for Windows NT
(see the end of this document).

4. Install the NetHASP Server Program (see "Installing the NetHASP
Server Program on the NetHASP Server" below).

The two following sections describe steps 2 and 4 in detail.


Setting the Tasking Option on the NetHASP Server
------------------------------------------------

This applies to IPX, NetBIOS and TCP/IP.

To set the Tasking Option on the NetHASP Server:

1. In the Program Manager, click the Main icon.

2. In the Main window, click the Control Panel icon.

3. In the Control Panel window, click the System icon.

4. In the System window, click the Tasking button.

5. In the Tasking window's Foreground/Background Responsiveness frame,
click: Foreground and Background Applications Equally Responsive

6. Click the OK button to set the tasking option.


Installing the NetHASP Server Program on the NetHASP Server
-----------------------------------------------------------

Activate the NetHASP Server Program for the active communication
protocol:

* For NetBIOS and TCP/IP, activate NHSRVWNT.EXE - the native Win32
NetHASP Server Program (under NEC, activate NHSWNTJ.EXE).

* For IPX, activate NHSRVWIN.EXE - the Windows NetHASP Server
Program (under NEC, activate NHSWINJ.EXE).


Loading the NetHASP Server Program Automatically before User Log on
-------------------------------------------------------------------

To automatically load the NetHASP Server Program for Win32 before user
log on, use HINSTALL.EXE.

HINSTALL.EXE installs a HASP NT Loader implemented as a Windows NT
service. This loader automatically loads the NetHASP Server Program for
Win32. With the HASP NT Loader, you don't have to log on or interact
with the NT system.

To install the HASP NT Loader:

1. Enter hinstall /is

Note: This also installs the HASP Device Driver (see the end of
this document).

2. Copy NHSRVWNT.EXE or NHSWNTJ.EXE to the SYSTEM32 directory in the
Windows NT root directory (c:\%SystemRoot%\system32).

3. Shut down the system; when you bring the system back up, the HASP NT
Loader will automatically load the NetHASP Server Program.

To uninstall the HASP NT Loader:

1. Enter hinstall /r

2. Shut down the system.

Note: You need Administrator privileges to use HINSTALL.

If the HASP NT Loader has been installed properly, you can see its
entry in the Windows NT SCManager (Service Control Manager):

To see the entry in the SCManager:

1. From the Program Manager, choose Main.

2. Choose Control Panel, then Services; the HASP NT Loader entry
appears in the Services list.

3. Check that the Status field is empty, and that the Startup field has
the value Automatic.

Since the NetHASP Server Program loads automatically before the user
logs on, the HASP NT Loader and the NetHASP Server Program messages
do not appear on the screen. To see any related messages, you have
to log on. For example, if you try to load the NetHASP Server
Program without a HASP key connected, you won't see the "HASP not
found" error message until you log on.


Activity Log
------------

The NetHASP Server Program maintains an activity log. This is a table
containing a list of the current settings, parameters used, and other
information.

Installing NetHASP under Windows for Workgroups (WFW)

Providing that your WFW stations are configured properly, NetHASP works with
NetBEUI, IPX/SPX compatible transport with NetBIOS, or TCP/IP.


Working with NetBIOS
--------------------

To work with NetBIOS:

1. Configure the Network Setup of all WFW stations so that the
protocols (NetBEUI and/or IPX/SPX compatible transport with NetBIOS)
protocols are listed in the same order.

2. Load the NetHASP Server Program (NHSRVWIN.EXE under IBM, NHSWINJ.EXE
under NEC) with the -netbios switch as follows:

nhsrvwin -netbios

3. Set the following environment variable at each station activating
the protected application:

SET NETHASPPROTOCOL=NETBIOS

Note: You must set the environment variable in DOS before loading WFW.


Working with IPX
----------------

IPX does not support SAP services under WFW peer-to-peer. When the
NetHASP Server Program is loaded, it generates an address file -
NEWHADDR.DAT - which contains the address of the NetHASP Server.

To work with IPX:

1. Copy NEWHADDR.DAT to a location which is in the search map of all
stations.

2. Set the following environment variable at each station activating
the protected application:

SET NETHASPPROTOCOL=IPXNOSAP

Note: You must set the environment variable in DOS before loading WFW.


Working with TCP/IP
-------------------

To work with TCP/IP:

1. Load the NetHASP Server Program (NHSRVWIN.EXE under IBM, NHSWINJ.EXE
under NEC) with the -tcpip switch as follows:

nhsrvwin -tcpip

2. Configure the NetHASP configuration file accordingly (see below).

Installing NetHASP on WFW under Novell Netware
----------------------------------------------

With WFW under Novell Netware, NetHASP supports the IPX, NetBIOS, and
TCP/IP protocols. (Only Windows 16-bit and Win32-protected
applications support TCP/IP).

You can load HASPSERV.NLM on the Novell dedicated server.

NetHASP works with the default protocol as set in the WFW network
setup.

Note: To cross segments under NetBIOS, the default protocol must be
"IPX/SPX compatible transport with NetBIOS" (and not NetBEUI).


Installing NetHASP on WFW Connected to a Windows NT Server
----------------------------------------------------------

For information on installing NetHASP on the Windows NT Server, see
"Installing NetHASP on a Windows NT Station" above. We recommend you
load the NetHASP Server Program on the Windows NT Server, and work with
the NetBIOS protocol.

The NetHASP Servers

The following table lists the various NetHASP Servers, and the NetHASP Server Programs you can load on each.

           !NetHASP Server                 | Protocol | !NetHASP Server Pgm
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

DOS environment under Novell              |   IPX    |    HASPSERV.EXE
Windows environment under Novell          |   IPX    |    NHSRVWIN.EXE
DOS environment under DLink, Lantastic    |  !NetBIOS |    HASPSERV.EXE
Windows environment under DLink, Lantastic|  !NetBIOS |    NHSRVWIN.EXE
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
Netware 286 Dedicated Server              |   IPX    |    HASPSERV.VAP
Netware 386 Dedicated Server              |   IPX    |    HASPSERV.NLM
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
Windows NT station                        |  !NetBIOS |    NHSRVWNT.EXE
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
OS/2 server under Lan Manager,            |          |
Lan Server, 3 COM                         |  !NetBIOS |    NHSRVOS2.EXE
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Note for IPX Users

In a network environment that uses the IPX protocol, the NetHASP Server
Program first tries to find out if the Novell SAP services are available.
The NetHASP Server Program uses the SAP advertising services to advertise
the network address of the NetHASP Server to the entire network.

Some IPX-based networks such as Novell ELS-I, Netware Lite, Personal Netware,
and Windows for Workgroups, do not implement SAP and therefore cannot use the
advertising services. These network environments require a different
advertising mechanism.

For this reason, when you load the NetHASP Server Program, two identical
files containing the address of the NetHASP Server are created: HASPADDR.DAT
and NEWHADDR.DAT. Protected applications running in the above mentioned
networks access these files for the address of the NetHASP Server.

HASPADDR.DAT and NEWHADDR.DAT are created in the same sub-directory that
contains the NetHASP Server Program. After they are created, copy them to a
sub-directory to which all the authorized users have read permission. The
protected application can then access the files.

Two such sub-directories are:

- A directory defined in the network's search map (e.g. the SYS:PUBLIC
directory or a directory defined by the DOS APPEND command).

- The directory that contains the protected software.

Note: Always delete HASPADDR.DAT and NEWHADDR.DAT after moving the NetHASP
Server Program to another directory, after loading it on another PC,
or after rebooting the NetHASP Server. If you do not delete
HASPADDR.DAT and NEWHADDR.DAT, the protected software will run slowly,
or it might not run at all.

Adapting NetHASP to the Communication Protocol

The NetHASP system works with networks based on the IPX and NetBIOS
communication protocols. Both the NetHASP Server Program and the protected
application use the communication protocol they find active in the network
environment. First, they try to use the IPX protocol. If IPX is not active,
they try to use the NetBIOS protocol.

You can override the automatic protocol recognition of the NetHASP system,
and force the NetHASP Server Program and the protected application to use a
protocol you select (if this protocol is active in the environment). To do
this:

1. Load the NetHASP Server Program with one of the following switches:
NETBIOS, IPX or IPXNOSAP.

2. Set the NETHASPPROTOCOL environment variable at each station
activating the protected application: NETBIOS, IPX, or IPXNOSAP.
Do this in accordance with the switch you used when loading the
NetHASP Server Program.

Use the switch and set the environment variable in the following cases:

NETBIOS - When you want the NetHASP system to use the NetBIOS
protocol if NetBIOS is active in the environment,
although IPX protocol is recognized automatically.

IPX - When you want the NetHASP system to use the IPX
protocol if IPX is active in the environment and
if it is not recognized automatically.

IPXNOSAP - When you want the NetHASP system to use the IPX
protocol without the SAP services, if IPX is active
in the environment and if it is not recognized
automatically. (For ELS-I, Netware Lite, Personal
Netware, and Windows for Workgroups.)


Example
-------

In a Novell 3.12 network environment, IPX and also NetBIOS emulation are
the active communication protocols. When you load the NetHASP Server
Program, it uses the IPX protocol by default. To override IPX and force
the NetHASP system to use the NetBIOS protocol, perform the following
steps:

1. Connect the NetHASP key to a DOS station.

2. Load HASPSERV.EXE as follows: haspserv -netbios

3. Set the NETHASPPROTOCOL environment variable (use uppercase
letters) at each station activating the protected application,
as follows: SET NETHASPPROTOCOL=NETBIOS


Note: To load HASPSERV.NLM with a switch, just enter the name of the switch.
To load HASPSERV.EXE, NHSRVWIN.EXE, NHSRVWNT.EXE, or NHSRVOS2.EXE with
a switch, enter a minus character before the name of the switch.

Defining the Range of Stations Served by the NetHASP Server

Defining the range of stations served by the NetHASP Server may be useful in
large network environments. This section describes how to control the NetHASP
system to allow only some of the stations to access the NetHASP key and
activate the protected application.

Defining the Range of Stations under IPX

In a network environment that uses the IPX protocol, the NetHASP Server
Program first checks whether the Novell SAP services are available. The
!NetHASP Server Program then uses the SAP advertising services to advertise
the network address of the NetHASP Server to the entire network. This
ensures that all the network stations can access the NetHASP key and activate
the protected application.

You can let only some of the stations to access the key. To do this, you
prevent the address of the NetHASP Server from being advertised throughout
the entire network. Instead, the address is saved to two files. You can then
determine which stations may activate the protected application. You let
these stations access the two files to find the address of the NetHASP
Server.

To define the range of stations, perform the following steps:

1. Load the NetHASP Server Program (HASPSERV.NLM, HASPSERV.EXE, or
NHSRVWIN.EXE) with the IPXNOSAP switch. This ensures that the
address of the NetHASP Server is not advertised. Instead, it is
saved in two files: HASPADDR.DAT and NEWHADDR.DAT.

2. Copy the two DAT files to a location to which each station in the
required range has a read permission. Only stations that can read
the address from these files can access the NetHASP key and
activate the protected application.

3. Set an environment variable at each station in the range, as follows:

SET NETHASPPROTOCOL=IPXNOSAP (use uppercase letters)

This instructs the protected application running on the station to
search for the two DAT files to read the address of the NetHASP
Server.

Note: To define the range of stations in an IPX network environment that
does not implement the SAP services, repeat steps 1 to 3. However,
you do not need to load the NetHASP Server Program with the IPXNOSAP
switch, since without the SAP services the address of the NetHASP
Server is not advertised.

Defining the Range of Stations under NetBIOS

To allow only some of the stations to access the key in a NetBIOS network,
define the NetBIOS name of the NetHASP Server station. Then link the stations
in the required range to that name.

To determine the range of stations, perform the following steps:

1. Load the NetHASP Server Program (HASPSERV.EXE, NHSRVWIN.EXE,
NHSRVWNT.EXE, NHSRVOS2.EXE) with the NETHASPNBNAME switch assigned
to a name of your choice (up to 8 case sensitive characters).
For example:

haspserv -nethaspnbname=firstsrv

This loads HASPSERV.EXE and defines the station's NetBIOS name as
"firstsrv".

2. Set the NETHASPNBNAME environment variable at each station in the
required range to the NetBIOS name of the NetHASP Server. For
example:

set nethaspnbname=firstsrv

This links the station to the NetHASP Server named "firstsrv".

When you activate a protected application on this station, it
searches for a NetHASP Server Program loaded with the switch
-nethaspnbname=firstsrv.

Adapting the Timeout Length

The NetHASP Server Program cannot serve two requests simultaneously. The
timeout length determines how long a protected application repeatedly tries
to access the NetHASP server before it gives up. For this purpose, two
variables have been defined, NETHASPSESSION and NETHASPSENDRCV. If required,
set these variables at each station running the protected application.

In almost all networks, the default values of the variables are sufficient
(see below). Change the default values only in networks that have a NetHASP
connected to a slow station such as an XT.

To determine the timeout length, set the environment variables as follows
(the values are in seconds):

SET NETHASPSESSION=n

SET NETHASPSENDRCV=m

NETHASPSESSION - Determines the maximum length of time during
which the protected application tries to
establish a connection with the NetHASP Server.
The default value is 30 seconds.

NETHASPSENDRCV - Determines the maximum length of time for each
"send and receive" packet. The default value is
5 seconds.

Note

If you are running a DOS protected application under Windows NT, and you
need to set an environment variable, perform the following:

1. In the Program Manager click on the Main icon.

2. In the Main window click on the Control Panel icon.

3. In the Control Panel window click on the System icon.

4. The System Environment Variables list contains all of the
environment variables. To add a variable edit the following
fields at the bottom of the System window:
- In the Variable field enter the variable name (i.e. NETHASPPROTOCOL).
- In the Value field enter the variable's value (i.e. NETBIOS).

5. Click on the Set button to add the variable to the list.

Defining the Number of Protected Applications Served by HASPSERV.EXE

When HASPSERV.EXE is loaded, it allocates memory space for 250 Protected
Applications (about 4K). If necessary, you can save memory space by changing
this default value. To do this load HASPSERV as follows:

haspserv -userlist=n

This limits the number of protected applications to n.

Local Networks and Internetworks under Novell

This section is relevant to users working in Novell networks consisting of
several interconnected networks.

A local network is a single cabling scheme identified by a unique network
number, to which one or more stations are connected. An internetwork is a
group of two or more local networks linked together.

When you load the NetHASP Server Program, by default it advertises its name
to the entire internetwork. Also by default, the NetHASP Server Program
serves all of the internetwork's local networks and stations. You can,
however, instruct the NetHASP Server Program to serve only a specific local
network. If the default situation suits you, and you want the NetHASP
Server Program to serve the entire internetwork, the following sections
are not relevant to you, and you may skip to the next chapter.

The following sections describe how to load the various NetHASP Server
Programs to serve a local network only.

Specifying Local Networks with HASPSERV.NLM

To instruct HASPSERV.NLM to serve only those local networks connected to
the file server on which HASPSERV.NLM is running, load it with the LOCALNET
switch:

load haspserv localnet

To instruct a station to communicate only with the HASPSERV.NLM that serves
the station's local network (and not with other HASPSERVs loaded in the
internetwork) set the following environment variable:

set nethaspprotocol=localnet

To instruct HASPSERV to advertise its address with a specific local network
number, load it with the NET switch:

load haspserv net m [ net n ...... ]

where m and n are IPX network numbers in the internetwork. To find out the
network numbers of a NetHASP Server, enter config in the file server
console. The information displayed on the screen contains the network numbers.

Note that although HASPSERV.NLM advertises its address with specific network
numbers, it continues to serve all of the stations in the entire
internetwork. HASPSERV serves the specified local networks only when it is
loaded with the LOCALNET switch and with the NET switch, concurrently.


Example

An internetwork consists of local networks 111, 222, 333, etc. HASPSERV.NLM
is running on a file server to which local networks 111 and 222 are
connected directly. You want the protected application to run only on
stations belonging to local network 111. Originally, HASPSERV.NLM was loaded
as follows:

load haspserv

Loaded this way, HASPSERV.NLM serves all the local networks in the entire
internetwork. This allows stations from local networks other than local
network 111 to access the NetHASP key and to "steal" user authorizations.
In addition, stations from local network 111 search for the NetHASP key
throughout the entire internetwork. This is an unnecessary and time-consuming
process.

To solve this problem:

1. Load HASPSERV.NLM as follows:

load haspserv net 111 localnet

The LOCALNET switch prevents HASPSERV.NLM from serving all the
stations in the entire internetwork. Moreover, the NET switch
ensures that HASPSERV.NLM now serves only local network 111.

2. To ensure that the stations in local network 111 communicate with
the above HASPSERV.NLM, and not with others in the internetwork,
set the following environment variable at each station:

set nethaspprotocol=localnet

Specifying Local Networks with HASPSERV.VAP

To instruct HASPSERV.VAP to serve a local network or an internetwork, use
the following console commands (respectively):

: hasplocalnet

: haspinternet

Specifying Local Networks with other Servers

To instruct HASPSERV.EXE or NHSRVWIN.EXE to serve a local network, load it
using the following switch:

haspserv -localnet

or

nhsrvwin -localnet

If you load the NetHASP Server Program without using the LOCALNET switch, it
serves all of the networks and stations in the entire internetwork. You can,
however, instruct a station to access only the NetHASP Server Program that
advertised its name with the station's local network. To do this, set the
station's environment variable, NETHASPPROTOCOL, as follows:

set nethaspprotocol=localnet

Collisions Between Network and Parallel Ports on PCs

When installing a network card you must specify the I/O port for the
card. Normally, network cards take up 10h or 20h I/O ports
consecutively from their base address.

On IBM PCs & compatibles, parallel ports are assigned to one of the
following I/O ports: 3BCh; 378h; 278h.

When the I/O port of a network card overlaps that of a parallel card,
any access to the parallel port, e.g. printing, access to software
protection keys and peripherals connected to the parallel port, may
cause the computer to hang.

It is therefore essential to avoid overlapping, by changing the I/O
base of the network card. This can be done in one of the following
ways:

a. Some network cards enable assigning the I/O base with
jumpers. The card documentation describe which positions to set
the jumpers for a given I/O base.

b. With newer cards, you can change the I/O base with
software. When generating the IPX, you are asked to specify the
I/O base of the card.

For example:

A network card is installed on I/O port 360h, taking up 20h ports
(up to 37Fh). In this situation, there is an overlap with parallel port
378h. Any activity on this parallel port will cause the computer to
hang. To avoid overlap, change the I/O base of the network card to 300h.

To check for collisions do the following:

Write the following command on the server when it is in console mode:

config

A list containing all of the network cards and their addresses will
appear on the screen. Check if any of these addresses overlap
those of parallel cards.

NetHASP Configuration File

NetHASP now gives you the option of using a configuration file. This file
contains parameters and other fine-tuning settings for the protected
application. If the protected application finds a configuration file,
it reads it and uses the information. Otherwise, it uses default values.

The protected application searches for the NetHASP configuration file
as follows:

DOS - searches (in order) - Current directory, search map
Windows - searches (in order) - Working directory, current directory, search map

The name of the NetHASP configuration file is "NETHASP.INI".

The NetHASP configuration file consists of four sections, each of which is
optional:

* NH_COMMON

* NH_IPX

* NH_NETBIOS

* NH_TCPIP

Settings in the NH_COMMON section are common to all sections of the
configuration file. If you reset a keyword in another section, it overrides
the common setting in that section only.

Each section contains both General and Section-specific keywords. You can
use General keywords in any section of the configuration file.
Section-specific keywords are available to only one particular section.

Note:
* All names are case insensitive.

* To add comments, precede them with a semicolon (;).

* API and Envelope settings override the settings of environment
variables. Environment variables override configuration file
settings.

Configuration file syntax is as follows:

[NH_COMMON]

Section-specific Keywords

You can set only one of the following three keywords to Enabled.

NH_IPX = Enabled or Disabled Use the IPX protocol.

NH_NETBIOS = Enabled or Disabled Use the NetBIOS protocol.

NH_TCPIP = Enabled or Disabled Use the TCP/IP protocol.

NH_MACHINE = IBM or NEC The computer on which the protected
application is activated. Default: IBM

General Keywords

NH_SESSION = <Num> See the description of NETHASPSESSION above.

NH_SEND_RCV = <Num> See the description of NETHASPSENDRCV above.


[NH_IPX]

Section-specific Keywords for the IPX protocol

NH_USE_SAP = Enabled or Disabled Use IPX with SAP. Default: Enabled

General Keywords

NH_SEARCH_METHOD = Localnet or Internet See the description of LOCALNET above.

NH_SERVER_NAME = <Name1>, <Name2>,... Communicate with the NetHASP Server
with the specified name(s).
Maximum: 6 names, up to 7 case-insensitive chars each.

NH_SESSION = <Num> See the description of NETHASPSESSION above.

NH_SEND_RCV = <Num> See the description of NETHASPSENDRCV above.


[NH_NETBIOS]

Section-specific Keywords for the NetBIOS protocol

NH_NBNAME = <Name> Assign a name to the NetHASP Server.
1 name possible, up to 8 case-insensitive characters.

General Keywords

NH_SESSION = <Num> See the description of NETHASPSESSION above.

NH_SEND_RCV = <Num> See the description of NETHASPSENDRCV above.


[NH_TCPIP]

Section-specific Keywords for the TCP/IP protocol

NH_SERVER_ADDR = <Addr1>, <Addr2> IP addresses of all the NetHASP
Servers you want to search.
Unlimited addresses and multiple
lines are possible. Possible
address format examples:
IP address: 192.114.176.65
Local Hostname: ftp.aladdin.co.il

NH_PORT_NUMBER = <Num> Set the TCP/IP port number. This
is optional. The default number
is 475.

General Keywords

NH_SEARCH_METHOD = Localnet or Internet See the description of LOCALNET above.

NH_SERVER_NAME = <Name1>, <Name2>,... Communicate with the NetHASP Server
with the specified name. Maximum 6 names, up to 7
case-insensitive characters each.

NH_SESSION = <Num> See the description of NETHASPSESSION above.

NH_SEND_RCV = <Num> See the description of NETHASPSENDRCV above.

The HASP Device Driver for Win32

You must install the HASP Device Driver on any Windows NT or Windows 95
station to which a NetHASP key is connected.

Use HINSTALL to install the HASP Device Driver.

Note: You need Administrator privileges to use HINSTALL.

To install the HASP Device Driver:

1. At the command prompt, enter

hinstall /i

2. Reboot your system; the HASP Device Driver is installed.

To remove the driver:

1. At the command prompt, enter

hinstall /r

2. Reboot your system. The HASP Device Driver is removed.

To upgrade the driver:

1. Remove the existing driver.

2. Install the new version.

Note: For Windows NT V3.1, use HINSTALL V1.31. If you don't have it,
contact your software vendor.

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